Nov. 28th, 2018

KMH Finale!

The results of the artistic research project

 

MUSIC IN DISORDER — COUNTERPLAY, COMPLEXITY AND COLLECTIVE IMPROVISATION

 

will be presented 28-30 November 2018 at the Royal College of Music in Stockholm

 

Wednesday 28 November, 15.30, Black Box
Public presentation
15.30 – 17.00 Presentations, demonstrations, questions (pre-booking required)
17.15 – 18.30 Open Lab (dropin)

 

Thursdag 29 November 19.00, Black Box 
Public concert (pre-booking required)

 

Friday 30 November 10.00, Nathan Milstein Hall
Public research seminar
10.00 – 12.00: Åsa Stjerna & panel discussion (with Kim Hedås, Stefan Östersjö, Henrik Frisk, among others)
12.00 – 13.00: Lunch break
13.00 – 15.00: More discussions, and questions/comments from the auditorium

 

The main focus of the project has been to explore collective improvisation in music, thereby contributing to a deeper understanding of collective creativity. When is a creative process truly collective? How can we create circumstances that are beneficial to collective creativity? And what is the social or political importance of collective creativity?

 

We will present a collection of methods for “disordering” that, paradoxically, serve as collective reference points yet at the same time enhance the potential for heterogeneity. These methods could also become useful in other fields where collective creativity is involved. The project’s results contrasts to views that overemphasize intentional control, individual choice and common denominators. With disordering methods, collective creativity instead requires intense listening to differences that pass between participants, involving a process by which everyone can continuously respond to opportunities for simultaneous divergence and convergence. This invites for differences to act productively against each other and has relevance for socio-political contexts beyond music. The project also sheds light on experimental art as a playful way of engaging in a transformative practice, with a perhaps underestimated relevance for modern society.

Category KMH Finale!

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